AVS Webinar: Surface Characterization of Biomaterials with X-rays and Ion Guns

Surfaces play an important role in almost all aspects of our lives.  For example, biosensors that are used to detect and identify diseases are often based on chemical surface modifications. The interaction of small molecules or nanoparticles with surfaces such as lung tissue is also often dictated by surface chemistry. This means that it is critical to know as much as possible about a surface in order to both understand the interactions that occur and to be able to design surfaces that promote successful interactions.

Who Should Attend

This webinar is intended for researchers, students, technologists and others involved in research with biomaterial and biological surfaces who are looking to gain an understanding or broaden their knowledge on how XPS and ToF-SIMS can help in characterizing biological and biomaterial surfaces and interactions. The course will be beneficial to a large audience, from young scientists to engineers, as various aspects from instrumentation through best practices for sample handling, data collection and data analysis will be discussed in the context of characterizing organic materials with XPS and ToF-SIMS.

The deadline for registration for this workshop is Sept 11, 2020 and you can register for it here.

Overview
Date: Wednesday, September 16, 2020
Time: 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT
Platform: Zoom
Cost:

Please note this workshop is NOT free, but there is student pricing.

Rigaku Virtual Conference on XRD and XRF August 4-6!

Rigaku will be hosting a virtual conference on XRD and XRF this week that is free to register here!

Due to the COVID-19 induced cancellations of the Microscopy & MicroAnalysis, Denver X-ray, and American Crystallographic Association physical conferences this summer, Rigaku will be live webcasting a 3-day virtual Analytical X-ray Convention from our laboratory facility in Texas. The webcasts will take place Tuesday 8/4 – Thursday 8/6 and will feature live seminars on X-ray techniques and live instrument demonstrations.

Enjoy the presentations on Channel 1 (XRD), Channel 2 (XRF) and Channel 3 (X-ray Microscopy), and make sure to stop by our Concierge Booth on Channel 4 to say hello, live video chat, and participate in some fun events. We will be announcing upcoming Channel 4 events on the channel itself and via our Rigaku twitter feed (@rigaku, hashtag #RAXC2020), which you can view see on the right to keep up to date with what is going on.

Check the starting times for each day in the program, as different channels have different starting times. All four channels will be broadcast simultaneously and you can move among the four booths using the channel links.

Note that the three guest presentations—to be given by Rigaku sponsors—will all take place on channel 3. This has been updated on the program schedule.

Webinar – How is Particle Size Measured

Masterclass
October 23
10:30 ET
The MCF will be showing this webinar on the monitor in Marcus at 10:30AM on October 23rd.
—-
There is a gamut of particle size distribution measurement techniques each with established history and advantages.

The killer word in particle size distribution is the last one (distribution) and measurement of broad distributions is the bane of all sizing techniques.

After a very short introduction to ‘how much sample should we measure to describe the distribution’, we’ll be running through the background of some of the more popular techniques (sieves, sedimentation, electrical-sensing zone) and will emphasize the popular light scattering techniques of laser diffraction and dynamic light scattering.

As an aside, we’ll be mentioning Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS).

Webinar: Cold and Colder, Nanoindentation Down to -120°C

This webinar will be presented in the lobby of the MCF in the Marcus Building on Thursday, April 19th


8AM PDT | 11AM EDT | 15:00 GMT

Materials behavior is often dominated by highly localized phenomena, and the ability to probe these local properties for engineering devices is critical. Often these devices are operating in environments with large differences in temperature and pressure: from the high vacuum and cold of space to the high temperature and high pressure inside a deep-water oil well. This webinar will focus on testing from room temperature down to -100°C on a variety of materials classes;

Metals/Composites:
A fundamental study in a low carbon, 1018, steel is presented. This material is non-exotic, but plays a large role in the nuts and bolts of everyday life. 1018 steel is a two phase steel, containing both ferrite and pearlite phases that are easy to distinguish both via in contact SPM and high speed mapping of the steel, with the high C pearlite being much harder than the ferrite. This material also exhibits a ductile to brittle temperature transition at -5°C via Charpy impact testing. However, when the individual phases can be examined separately, the DBTT can be described to each phase. Besides a rapid increase in hardness, as the ability to cross-slip decreases, there is a change in the behavior of the load-displacement curve from smooth to heavily serrated flow dominated by pop-in behavior in the ferrite phase.

Polymer Films:
Determining the glass transition temperature of polymer films can be difficult due to specimen geometry that does not conform to typical macroscale test algorithms. Here, determination of polymer thin films is demonstrated by varying both temperature and frequency using a nanoscale equivalent test, nanoDMA III. Control of operating conditions below room temperature here is critical to understanding materials performance in a cold weather environment.

To find out more information or to sign up independently, you can click here.

Webinar: Nanoscale Tribology – Understanding Mechanical and Tribological Surface Modification in Lubricated Contacts

Webinar on Nanoscale Tribology: Understanding Mechanical and Tribological Surface Modification in Lubricated Contacts

This webinar will be on display in the lobby of the MCF in the Marcus Building at 11:00AM on March 15th.

Tribological properties play a critical role in the proper function, longevity, and energy efficiency of mechanical systems. The ability to quantitatively characterize surface interactions over the nanoscale and microscale provides a new understanding of how to better control friction and wear behavior in bulk material systems and thin tribological films.

In this webinar we will discuss the theory and applications of tribological and mechanical characterization over the nanometer to micrometer length scales. Practical applications will be presented relating to the field of lubricated sliding materials found in pistons, bearings, rubber gaskets, and other interacting components used in engines and power trains. We will demonstrate how nanoscale indentation and scratch testing provides powerful information for studying localized changes due to tribological processes and how these complimentary techniques provide greater insight to optimize tribological performance.

You can find more information and sign up for it to watch it at your desk here.

 

Webinar: Characterizing liposome formation, structure and stability with complementary techniques

If you are interested in characterizing both biological and synthetic nanoparticles, then join us for a free webinar. We will look at optimal conditions for extruding liposomes and will analyze their stability under different conditions. Our aim is to further educate the public about the intricacies of liposome formation and characterization as measured by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) from the NanoSight product range, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering (DLS/ELS) from the Zetasizer product range, and small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) from the X-ray analytical product range within Malvern Panalytical.

This webinar will be on display in the lobby of the MCF in the Marcus Building.

Webinar details:
Title: Characterizing liposome formation, structure and stability with complementary techniques
Time: 1:00 PM (GMT-05:00) Eastern [New York] Duration: 60 minutes
Presenters: Ragy Ragheb, technical specialist at Malvern Panalytical and
Joerg Bolze, product specialist XRD at Malvern Panalytical

Webinar on Powder Diffraction by Malvern PANalytical

Introduction to Practical X-ray Powder Diffractometry

This presentation teaches the basic principles of X-ray diffraction and what information can be learned from an X-ray diffraction pattern. This presentation does not delve deeply into the mathematics or physics of diffraction, but rather focuses on illustrating the power of this materials analysis technique. It is intended for a broad audience—technicians, managers, students, professor moving from single crystal diffractometry into powder diffractometry, and those who are considering if X-ray diffraction could be a beneficial addition to their lab.

X-Ray Powder Diffraction is most often used to answer the questions: what is in the sample and how much? With modern diffractometers, it is possible to load a sample, push a single button, and get an answer. But … where did that answer come from? How reliable is it? What other information might be available in the data? This talk will dissect the X-ray powder diffraction pattern and show the wealth of information contained within.

More information can be found here.

Webinar: XPM: High Speed Nanoindentation and Mechanical Property Mapping

XPM: High Speed Nanoindentation and Mechanical Property Mapping
A Bruker/Hysitron Webinar
Oct. 5th
8AM PDT | 11AM EDT | 15:00 GMT
 
Nanoindentation techniques have long had an important role in quantitatively evaluating the mechanical properties of microstructural features. In recent years, high speed nanoindentation mapping techniques have been under development and have recently achieved speeds up to 6 indents/second, approximately 500x faster than traditional nanoindentation mapping methodologies. This enables a one-to-one correlation with other techniques, such as EBSD, and provides corresponding large data sets for robust statistical analysis. This correlation can produce high resolution structure-property relationships which can be mapped over sub-micron to several hundreds of micron length scales. High speed nanoindentation has numerous potential applications, from evaluation of microstructure-property evolution during processing, quality control testing of weld zones, evaluation of sub-surface damage gradients (wear, corrosion, irradiation), composite material interfaces, and more.
This will be displayed on the large monitor in the Characterization Facility in Marcus. If you would like more information or want to register on your own, you can do so here.

Webinar – XRF Theory

X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a powerful technique for the analysis of elemental compositions of solid, powdered, and liquid materials. It can deliver high precision, quantitative results for both process control and completely unknown samples using purpose built calibrations.

High quality results can also be obtained using powerful standardless analysis software. This webinar covers the basics of the technique, extent of its capabilities, instrument types, and touches on the important topic of sample preparation. The webinar is geared toward those with little or no experience with XRF wishing to learn more and will be displayed in the lobby of the MCF in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building at 10:00AM on June 7, 2017.

More details can be found here.

Webinar – Is the X-ray diffraction theory we use correct? May 30, 2017

The theory of X-ray diffraction from crystals has been established for over 100 years; although it is still used, it cannot account for some of the experimental data. The theory combined with measured data can sometimes lead to the wrong structural model. In this webinar you will hear about a new theory that includes the diffraction from crystals in all directions, which explains the diffraction from polycrystalline materials and the data collected in serial crystallography without the need for complex structural requirements.

This webinar will be on display of the lobby of the MCF in the Marcus Nanotechnology Building at 11:00EST on May 30, 2017.

More information can be found here.